Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar

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  • Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar or Dr. BR Ambedkar was born in April 14, 1891, is popularly known as Baba Saheb, the principal architect of the Indian Constitution, was also a jurist, economist, politician and social reformer who inspired several social movements later.
  • Ambedkar was born into a poor low Mahar (dalit) caste, who were treated as untouchables and subjected to socio-economic discrimination.
  • Dr. BR Ambedkar, who campaigned against social discrimination against Untouchables (Dalits), was the first law minister of independent India.
  • Ambedkar viewed the Shudras as Aryan and adamantly rejected the Aryan invasion theory.
  • In 1920, he began the publication of the weekly Mooknayak (Leader of the Silent) in Mumbai.
  •  He established the Bahishkrit Hitakarini Sabha.
  • For the defence of Dalit rights, he started many periodicals like Mook Nayak, Bahishkrit Bharat, and Equality Janta.
  • Dr. Ambedkar was a prolific student, obtained doctorates in economics from both Columbia University and the London School of Economics.
  • In 1936, Ambedkar founded the Independent Labour Party.
  • Ambedkar oversaw the transformation of his political party into the Scheduled Castes Federation.
  • Ambedkar published his book Annihilation of Caste on 15 May 1936.
  • In 1990, the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian award, was posthumously conferred upon Dr. Ambedkar.
  • Taking a vow of ridding untouchability and inhuman injustice, he rebelled against Manu, Ancient India’s lawmaker, the supporter of the caste system, and dethroned him.
  • On 25 December 1927, he led thousands of followers to burn copies of Manusmrti. Thus annually 25 December is celebrated as Manusmriti Dahan Din (Manusmriti Burning Day) by Ambedkarites and Dalits.
  • Baba Saheb Ambedkar’s role is important in constitutionalising India, evident first in his witness to the 1919 Southborough Committee on Franchise, followed by his intervention in the 1930 Round Table Conference in London, where he defended compensatory discrimination for the untouchables in opposition to Mahatma Gandhi.