Burnout

Occupational burnout is thought to result from long-term, unresolvable, job stress. In 1974, Herbert Freudenberger became the first researcher to publish in a psychology-related journal a paper that used the term burnout.

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It was recently affirmed as a medical diagnosis in May 2019 when World Health Organization added Burnout to the ICD-11 (International Classification of Diseases- 11).

Symptoms

Burnout is characterised by a set of symptoms that includes exhaustion resulting from work’s excessive demands as well as physical symptoms such as headaches and sleeplessness, “quickness to anger” and closed thinking. The burned-out worker “looks, acts, and seems depressed”.

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Diagnosis

It was recently affirmed as a medical diagnosis in May 2019 when World Health Organization added Burnout to the ICD-11. Burnout  is diagnosed as a three-dimensional syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment.

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Effects

Burnout is associated with reduced job performance, coronary heart disease, and mental health problems. Chronic burnout is also associated with cognitive impairments such as memory and attention. Occupational burnout is also associated with absences, time missed from work, and thoughts of quitting.

What is International Classification of Diseases (ICD)?

The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the international “standard diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes.” Its full official name is International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.

The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO), which is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.

The ICD is originally designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease.